Category Archives: Maria Sanchez Show

Russell Hirshon, Presidential Candidate?

Russell Hirshon 2016

This week on ‘Shadow Politics’ for the first half hour, the special guest is Russell Hirshon. Mr. Hirshon ran for Mayor for Washington D.C in 1990 & for president in 1992. Surprisingly, Russell Hirshon has decided to throw his hat into the ring & join this year’s campaign for the presidency! At the completion of this interview join us as we discuss this past week’s world & national news . . . everything from sanctions being lifted on Myanmar to Apple’s software release of IOS 10.

 

Click the link below to listen to the recorded podcast:

9/11 New York Memorial

 

Today marks 15 years since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Join us as we honor the victims and heroes on this very special day of remembrance. Kathleen Gomez will join us as she was living in New York during the event.

Click the link below to listen to the recorded podcast:

Brexit. What is the fallout?

Image result for brexit

The fallout from the Brexit votes continues. The Dow plunged 600 points on Friday. Prime Minister David Cameron tendered his resignation while other EU countries are considering their own referendum votes. Meanwhile, house Democrats staged an unsuccessful 25 hour sit-in to further gun control. And what have we learned thus far about Zika? Join us as we catch up on all recent world events!

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I have entered the world of dogs!

Miss Millie & chew toys - 2I was in San Diego last month attending to the needs of my elderly parents when I first encountered a foster mommy, her forever dog and the pup that she was taking care of that had been rescued from the streets of Los Angeles. I stopped and talking with her about the rescue organization and the circumstances regarding Millie’s need to be adopted.

The next day at a different time, in a different place I once again encountered Miss Millie, her foster mommy and forever dog. I asked if I could pick Millie up and I was told that’s what she lives for.

I scratched Millie’s face, she closed her eyes and leaned into my face. I was enchanted.

I have never had a dog as an adult. I was raised with a pet dog while I was growing up but it was clear that our dogs belonged to our father who took care of them, fed them, trained them etc.

I raised four children as a single mother. They were 2, 4, 6 and 8 when their father and I divorced. I used to say that I didn’t have time to potty train a dog because I was potty training children. I’ve been ‘home alone’ for nearly 5 years since my 4th child went off to college. The resulting freedom, independence and solitude were luxuries to me and the thought of taking on another responsibility was not in my game plan.

However, after I returned to my home last month, I couldn’t stop thinking about Millie and her circumstances. I logged onto the rescue’s website, www.forgottenpaws.org and saw Millie’s picture as available for adoption.

I contacted the woman that founded the rescue and she told me that Millie was indeed still available for adoption. I decided then and there that if I could raise 4 children, surely I’d be a good forever mommy to Miss Millie.

I drove back to San Diego to pick up Millie and we’ve been fast friends ever since! Millie loves everyone she encounters and every four legged friend too.

I take her to as many places as I can (that allow dogs) so as to incorporate her into her new life and make her as much a part of mine as possible.

Happy Chinese New Year 2015 – Year of the Goat

Chinese New Year GoatLet’s Celebrate the Chinese New Year!

Chinese New Year is the longest and most important celebration in the Chinese calendar. The Chinese year 4713 begins on Feb. 19, 2015.

Chinese months are reckoned by the lunar calendar, with each month beginning on the darkest day. New Year festivities traditionally start on the first day of the month and continue until the fifteenth, when the moon is brightest. In China, people may take weeks of holiday from work to prepare for and celebrate the New Year.

Legend has it that in ancient times, Buddha asked all the animals to meet him on Chinese New Year. Twelve came, and Buddha named a year after each one. He announced that the people born in each animal’s year would have some of that animal’s personality. Those born in sheep years are often artistic, charming, sensitive, and sweet. It is known as the most creative sign in the Chinese zodiac. Jane Austen, Boris Becker, Jamie Foxx, Mel Gibson, Michelangelo, Mark Twain, Rudolph Valentino, Barbara Walters, Bruce Willis, and Orville Wright were born in the year of the sheep.

At Chinese New Year celebrations people wear red clothes, decorate with poems on red paper, and give children “lucky money” in red envelopes. Red symbolizes fire, which according to legend can drive away bad luck. The fireworks that shower the festivities are rooted in a similar ancient custom. Long ago, people in China lit bamboo stalks, believing that the crackling flames would frighten evil spirits.

In China, the New Year is a time of family reunion. Family members gather at each other’s homes for visits and shared meals, most significantly a feast on New Year’s Eve. In the United States, however, many early Chinese immigrants arrived without their families, and found a sense of community through neighborhood associations instead. Today, many Chinese-American neighborhood associations host banquets and other New Year events.

The lantern festival is held on the fifteenth day of the first lunar month. Some of the lanterns may be works of art, painted with birds, animals, flowers, zodiac signs, and scenes from legend and history. People hang glowing lanterns in temples, and carry lanterns to an evening parade under the light of the full moon.

In many areas the highlight of the lantern festival is the dragon dance. The dragon—which might stretch a hundred feet long—is typically made of silk, paper, and bamboo. Traditionally the dragon is held aloft by young men who dance as they guide the colorful beast through the streets. In the United States, where the New Year is celebrated with a shortened schedule, the dragon dance always takes place on a weekend. In addition, many Chinese-American communities have added American parade elements such as marching bands and parades.

Although most Americans know today’s holiday as the Chinese New Year, the Chinese have been calling it the Spring Festival since 1912. That is because in 1912, they adopted the Gregorian calendar and moved to celebrating the New Year on January 1st. To preserve the holiday, they changed the name to the Spring Festival.

This holiday is one of the most significant in China, and originally developed as an opportunity to celebrate deities and ancestors. It was celebrated by gathering family together to feast, and consequently became an important opportunity for family to reconnect each year.