Category Archives: Self Improvement

Jules Martinez Hirst, Business/Social Etiquette Expert

Are you concerned about the lack of civility in America today and the polarization of our country? What does civility really mean?

And how does one incorporate the practice of civility into work and life? Our guest Jules Martinez Hirst is a sought-after business & social etiquette expert, co-author of ‘The Power of Civility’ and founder of Etiquette Consulting, Inc. Jules will be addressing these questions and more!

 

Clinical Forensic Psychologist, Dr. John Huber

Senator Brown has been invited to speak in Portugal at the Consulate about the ‘American Dream’ so he will not be with us. Our guest this week is Clinical Forensic Psychologist, Dr. John Huber! We’ll be discussing the Golden State Killer, his modus operandi, the volume of his victims, the cold-bloodedness, the fact that he was a police officer, and how this compares or is dissimilar from other serial killers.

Dr. John Huber is a mental health professional and university professor that has been in mental health for over twenty years. His experience began as a School Psychologist. Today, he is in private practice as a Clinical Forensic Psychologist, and he is a practitioner with privileges at two long term acute care hospitals. He is the Chairman of Mainstream Mental Health where the goal is to help people get mental health services. The target market for services are underprivileged and underinsured youth, veterans, and their families.

 

Kevin Hines

How many people have attempted suicide by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge and survive to talk about it? Not many. Our guest and first-time author, Kevin Hines, did survive and now has found a reason for living after years of suffering without help from ‘bipolar disorder with psychotic features’. In his book ‘Cracked, Not Broken’ Hines presents a vivid and moving memoir of how he descended into mental breakdown, fought to overcome demons, and made it his ‘life’s work to educate people all over this great country, and around the globe, to prevent suicide and understand mental illness.  

Kevin Hines has been featured in the critically acclaimed film “The Bridge,” (a 2006 Documentary film), Interviewed on Larry King Live, 20/20, Anderson Cooper 360, Good Morning America, and Ireland’s famed Tonight with Vincent Browne. He has been featured in hundreds of radio, film, and television media outlets. Kevin has written countless articles about suicide awareness/prevention and ‘The Art of Living Mentally Well.’ His articles have appeared in the San Francisco Medical Magazine, The Santa Barbara Independent, New Voices at Bay, the National Council Magazine, the San Francisco Chronicle, Advancements in Psychiatric Treatment, as well as many others. He was most recently honored as a Lifetime Achievement Award Winner by The National Council for Community Behavioral Health.

 

A New Era is Unfolding . . .

Student PictureDear Maria Sanchez Show fans.

I apologize for my absence from this website in the past several months. We’ve kept our blog very much alive and well and you can click on it to the right of the post to see what you may have missed there at TheMariaSanchezShow.com

However, I have begun a new journey that is a dream revisited and I wanted to share with you my next venture in life.

24 years ago I started my Masters degree in between child 3 and 4. A subsequent move back to the Los Angeles area from Portland, OR, a divorce and a career in radio postponed my dream. I applied for and I was accepted to Pepperdine University in their Graduate School of Education & Psychology to study for my Masters degree in Clinical Psychology.

My first semesters began in April of this year and continued until the end of July. My 3rd semester begins next week. I’m taking 5 classes. I just accepted the position of Public Relations Graduate Assistant for the Marketing Department of the Graduate School of Education & Psychology and those duties begin next week as well.

I cannot tell you how exciting it is to be a student once again. How much I adore being back in the classroom, surrounded by intelligent and curious minds, being taught by amazing faculty and learning about the field of psychology and all that it has to offer.

My intention is to graduate and to sit for the Marriage, Family, Therapy license (MFT) and perhaps thereafter the more recent discipline of the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC).

Unlike a lot of fields in today’s economy, psychology doesn’t discriminate regarding age. In fact, wisdom appears to be celebrated and thus the life that I have lived thus far, the experiences that I have had, the successes and the failures that I have been involved in and finally, the education and training that I am receiving all appear to be poised to help me to be of service to those in need.

As one of my professors so poignantly stated, psychology and therapy can help alleviate suffering, and that’s what I would like to do until I draw my last breath on this planet.

I see no need to retire. I’ve lived a wonderful life thus far, traveled to amazing places on this earth, volunteered my time, treasure and talent to some fantastic organizations and now I’d like to focus on the individual who is looking to seek some relief or a solution or fix a challenge. I will do my very best to keep my posts active as I continue along this journey as a student.

Thank you for taking the time to read what I have written.

Warmly,

Maria

Heart Health for Women & Men

Heart Month 2015Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States. It is also largely preventable. To bring awareness, the American Heart Association has declared February American Heart Month.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD)—including heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure—is the number 1 killer of women and men in the United States. It is a leading cause of disability, preventing Americans from working and enjoying family activities. CVD costs the United States over $300 billion each year, including the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.

CVD does not affect all groups of people in the same way. Although the number of preventable deaths has declined in people aged 65 to 74 years, it has remained unchanged in people under age 65. Men are more than twice as likely as women to die from preventable CVD.

Having a close relative who has heart disease puts you at higher risk for CVD. Health disparities based on geography also exist. During 2007–2009, death rates due to heart disease were the highest in the South and lowest in the West.

Race and ethnicity also affect your risk. Nearly 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of CVD. And African Americans are more likely than any other racial or ethnic group to have high blood pressure and to develop the condition earlier in life. About 2 in 5 African American adults have high blood pressure, yet fewer than half of them have the condition under control.

Many CVD deaths could have been prevented through healthier habits, healthier living spaces, and better management of conditions like high blood pressure and diabetes.

You can control a number of risk factors for CVD, including:

Diet
Physical activity
Tobacco use
Obesity
High blood pressure
High blood cholesterol
Diabetes

As you begin your journey to better heart health that can last a lifetime, keep these things in mind:

Try not to become overwhelmed. Every step brings you closer to a healthier heart, and every healthy choice makes a difference!
Partner up. The journey is more fun—and often more successful—when you have company. Ask friends and family to join you.
Don’t get discouraged. You may not be able to take all of the steps at one time. Get a good night’s sleep—also important for a healthy heart—and do what you can tomorrow.

Reward yourself. Find fun things to do to decrease your stress. Round up some colleagues for a lunchtime walk, join a singing group, or have a healthy dinner with your family or friends.

A healthy lifestyle can make all the difference for our hearts, so opt for healthy recipes like this one. To make it, you will need:

1/4 cup of orange juice
2 tablespoons of lemon juice
4 – 5 oz. salmon fillets with skin, rinsed and patted dry
1 1/2 tablespoons of dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon of curry powder
1/2 teaspoon of paprika
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of ground cinnamon
1 1/2 teaspoons of orange zest

Mix the orange and lemon juice in a large, shallow dish. Add the salmon, coat with the juice, and let marinate in the refrigerator for thirty minutes.

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Mix the brown sugar, curry powder, paprika, salt, cinnamon, and orange zest.

Drain the fish and arrange the fillets skin side down on a baking sheet. Rub with the brown sugar mixture. Bake for about 14 minutes, or until the fish is done.

Enjoy this recipe! To catch up on the latest from The Maria Sanchez Show, download the latest podcast today.